Unit Objectives:thomas-edison.jpg

A. The Expansion of Industry
B. Workers' Rights
C. Gilded Age Politics
D. Urban Changes
E. Societal Changes
F. Minority Groups

Essential Questions:

1. What is the difference between a Robber Baron and a Captain of Industry?
2. What determines the value/worth of a person in society?
3. How did American Culture change during the Gilded Age?


Key Terms: Important items, people and events of the era.

-Be sure know why they are important, not just their definitions.
Chapter 13:
patent, transcontinental railroad, Thomas Edison, George Westinghouse, alternating current, telegraph, Samuel Morse, telephone, Alexander Graham Bell, time zones, Bessemer Process, mass production, Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, Gospel of Wealth, philanthropy, Social Darwinism, capital, oligopoly, monopoly, cartel, vertical consolidation, horizontal consolidation, Standard Oil Trust, Sherman Anti-Trust Act, piecework, sweat shop, division of labor, socialism, collective bargaining, Knights of Labor, AFL, Wobblies, scabs, anarchists, Eugene V. Debbs, industrial union, Haymarket riot, Homestead Strike, Pullman Strike,
Chapter 15:
Gilded Age, laissez-faire, civil service, Pendleton Civil Service Act, Munn vs. Illinois, Credit Mobilier Scandal, Spoils system, rebates, Tariffs, steerage, quarantine, ghettos, restrictive covenants, Chinese Exclusion Act, Gentlemen's Agreement, alien, suburb, tenement dumbbell tenement, political machine, graft, Jacob Riis, Charity Organization Movement, Social Gospel Movement, Settlement Movement, settlement house, sociology, Jane Addams, Hull House, Nativism, temperance movement, prohibition,
Chapter 14:
14 Project
Chapter 16:
literacy, assimilation, philanthropic, Niagara Movement, McGuffey Readers, "three Rs", Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, vaudeville, yellow journalism, ragtime, Negro Spiritual, Jazz, Poll tax, grandfather clause, segregation, Jim Crow, Plessy v. Ferguson, lynching, NAACP, Tuskegee Institute, department store, RFD, mail-order catalog, "New Women"

Study Guide:

chapter 16 Study Guide

Class Notes:

Chapter 13
Chapter 15
Chapter 16
13.1 A Technological Revolution.ppt
13.2 The Growth of Big Business.ppt
15.3 The Challenges of the Cities.ppt
15.4 Ideas for Reform.ppt
16.1 The Expansion of Education.ppt
16.3 The World of Jim Crow.ppt
16.1 The Expansion of Education.ppt (No Blanks)

Jim Crow Laws


Unit Review:

Chapter 13
Chapter 15
Chapter 16
Guided Reading:
13.1GR.pdf
13.2GR.pdf
13.3GR.pdf
13.4GR.pdf
Guided Reading:
15.1GR.pdf
15.2GR.pdf
15.3GR.pdf
15.4GR.pdf
Guided Reading:
16.1GR.pdf
16.2GR.pdf
16.3GR.pdf
16.4GR.pdf
Summaries:
13.1S.pdf
13.2S.pdf
13.3S.pdf
13.4S.pdf
Summaries:
15.1S.pdf
15.2S.pdf
15.3S.pdf
15.4S.pdf
Summaries:
16.1S.pdf
16.2S.pdf
16.3S.pdf
16.4S.pdf


Activities:

Chapter 16 Section 2: Entertainment Magazine

*Each table member will choose a different topic from the following list: sports, theater, music, dance, or outdoor recreation
*Each student will write one or more entries to include on the group 4 page magazine.
-The group should have at least 8 articles, ads or pictures
-Attempt to leave no blank space on your papers, so plan out your magazine layout before you print out all your articles.
-The finished product may be used to help your group with a quiz that will occur next class period.
*Entries should include the following:
–What the activity is and who is presenting it
–When and where it takes place
–Who can attend and/or what audience you believe the activity is best suited for (men/women/children/family)
-You may write your articles as advertisements for up-coming events or as reviews of events you attended.
*Specifics for the final page:
–Articles should be well written (neat/good grammar/interesting/factual)
–Pages should be attractive (titled/colorful/well laid out/pictures)
*Articles will be assembled into your magazine during the first part of class on Thursday.
-Come prepared with printed out versions of your articles and pictures.
-Attempt to leave no blank spaces on your magazine

Fun Stuff: